Working from home with kids

I recently wrote a guest blog for The Resilient Mama about my experience of working from home with kids.  When I wrote it I wasn’t relating it to being at home working with kids whilst living through a pandemic but I think the tips are still relevant.  Let me know your thoughts.

 

Becky

 

How did I get here?

When I was growing up, I didn’t dream having a career in PR, if I am honest, I didn’t even know such a thing existed other than in the world of Absolutely Fabulous. When I was small, I had several dreams of what I would be which included:

Becoming a nun (I was about 8) – not because I was particularly religious but because I had a kid crush on Captain von Trapp from The Sound of Music. I don’t think wanting to marry a handsome man is reason to become a nun.

A heart and a lung surgeon (I was 11) – turns out I was ok at science (not great but ok) and biology was my best science but given I couldn’t really deal with any of the dissection stuff I doubt I would have been a success.

A lawyer – Not sure what prompted this desire.

I am sure if I spoke to my mum, she would have a full list of careers I had dreamt of. In the end I decided that I wanted to be a journalist and between the ages of 16 and 18 did quite a bit of work experience on local newspapers before heading to university to study a journalism degree.

I loved journalism until the point that I graduated and got a job as a journalist (well editorial assistant) at which point I realised that it wasn’t for me. I didn’t like the intrusiveness, the fact you were expected to knock on people’s doors at bad times in their lives and I didn’t enjoy the newsroom atmosphere (shouty with a lot of testosterone). After only a year I had a rethink and decided I still wanted to write, and I wanted to speak to people and hear their stories and that led me to the world of PR.

20 years later and I still love it. I love hearing what makes people tick, how they got to where they are, why they need help and helping them share that story. Whether it is working with a charity, getting a small business seen, helping people promote the work they are doing I enjoy it. I still get the same buzz when an event goes well, or I see a client in print or hear them on the radio as I did when I started out. In fact I maybe feel it even more now since I started working for myself and have my own clients, because I really enjoy working with all the businesses, I do PR for.

What do you love about your work?

PR Tips 3: Crisis comms

Having  a crisis communications plan is a little like taking out insurance, everybody hopes they never need it but you could regret it if you don’t have it.

Many small businesses think they don’t need a crisis plan but, it is important to have one in place.  The key things I would advise SME’s to have in place are the following:

  • A spokesperson should a crisis occur.  It is best to have only one of two people involved with this  as everybody trying to comment could be a disaster.
  • Think about how you deal with complaints on social media.  I would suggest, never delete the complaint, respond to the complaint you want followers to see that you are dealing with the issue, have a specific person who deals with online complaints and don’t get into arguments with the customer/client on social.
  • If the crisis looks like it is going to spread make sure you communicate with stakeholders and customers (where relevant)
  • Devise a  media statement as soon as possible
  • Respond to any media enquiries in a timely fashion
  • Advise the team that any queries regarding the crisis must be directed straight to the spokesperson.  What you don’t want to happen is the first staff hear about it is when the press call and they respond without thinking.
  • In advance and depending on your business think about key messages and how you would respond to any of the following incidents  (where relevant)
    • accidents that injure employees or others
    • property damage to company facilities
    • liability associated injury to or damage sustained by others
    • production or service interruptions
    • chemical spills or releases with potential off-site consequences, including environmental
    • product quality issues

This is just a very brief overview and crisis comms can be a very in-depth and tricky area.  If in doubt hire a professional.